Things To Know About Intrauterine Devices

What is an intrauterine device?
Intrauterine device (IUD) is one of the methods of contraception. An intrauterine device (IUD) is a small, plastic device that is placed inside the uterus for contraception.
What are the differences between different types of intrauterine devices?
In the United States, two types of intrauterine devices that are permitted to use are hormonal (endocrine) devices and copper-containing intrauterine devices. Hormone-containing intrauterine devices must be renewed every 5 years, while copper-containing intrauterine devices may hold for up to 10 years.
What is the effect of intrauterine device?
IUDs are significantly more effective than other contraceptives. However, intrauterine devices do not protect against the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases.
What is the mechanism of action of the intrauterine device?
For hormonal intrauterine devices, a small amount of the progestin hormone is released from the intrauterine device into the uterus. Progestin thickens mucus in the cervix, reducing the chance that sperm will penetrate inside the cervix

Progestin can make sperm less active.


Things To Know About Intrauterine Devices

It also thins the lining of the uterus, thereby preventing the nesting of fertilized eggs and shortening the menstrual cycle.
Copper intrauterine device releases a small amount of copper into the uterus. Copper can prevent fertilization and implantation of eggs in the lining of the uterus. Copper also prevents sperm from getting inside the uterus and into the fallopian tubes and reduces the ability for fertilized eggs.
Can all women use an intrauterine device?
Some women may not have an intrauterine device. The shape and size of each uterus may not be compatible with the intrauterine device. People with the most recent abnormal Pap test result or some other condition should not use an intrauterine device

How is an intrauterine device placed in the uterus?
Your doctor will be the one who placed and removed the uterus for you.


Things To Know About Intrauterine Devices

The intrauterine device is usually placed during or after your period. The intrauterine device is placed in a long, flat plastic tube. The tube is then inserted into the vagina and inserted into the uterus through the cervical opening. The intrauterine device is then ejected from the tube and the tube is pulled out.
Does placing an intrauterine device cause pain?
Using an intrauterine device does not require anesthesia (pain relief), although it may be a bit uncomfortable. Taking some over-the-counter pain relievers before the procedure can help improve this. Sometimes the doctor will use a local anesthetic when the intrauterine device is placed.
How to make sure the intrauterine device is in the right position?
Once the intrauterine device is placed, your doctor will show you how to check that the intrauterine device is in place.


Things To Know About Intrauterine Devices

Each intrauterine device is attached to a "tail" made of tough thread (called an intrauterine device). Once placed, the tail will only stick out of the cervix, located in the vagina for a length of 1-2 inches.
Regular tail checking is important. To do this, you have to put a finger in the vagina and feel the tail. You can do it at any time, but it's easy to remember right after your period. If you do not feel the tail, or if you feel an intrauterine device, call your doctor. The intrauterine device may have been dislodged. Remember to use other methods of contraception until the uterus is tested.


Things To Know About Intrauterine Devices

If you feel an intrauterine device, see your doctor and do not remove it yourself.
What are the benefits, risks and unwanted effects of intrauterine device use?
Benefit:
Easy to use and no need to use any other contraception.
Does not affect sexual activities as well as daily activities. You can still use a tampon with an intrauterine device.
Daily activities do not change the intrauterine device.
Hormones released from intrauterine devices can reduce abdominal pain and bleeding during menstruation.
Risk:
The intrauterine device may slip out of the cervix into the vagina.
An intrauterine device may cause perforation of the uterine wall during placement.


Things To Know About Intrauterine Devices


May cause inflammation of the uterus and fallopian tubes.
Other side effects:
Increases abdominal pain and menstrual bleeding (intrauterine device).
Little spasms and bleeding in the first few weeks after the insertion of the intrauterine device.
Vaginal discharge.
Interpretation of terms
Local anesthesia: Use medicine to relieve pain in one area of the body.
Pap test: A test that cells are taken from the cervix and vagina and examined under a microscope.
Progestin: Synthetic progesteron - similar to natural hormones produced by the body. Progesterone is a female sex hormone synthesized from the ovaries and helps the endometrial layer to grow; When progesterone levels drop, menstruation occurs.


Things To Know About Intrauterine Devices


Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs): Sexually transmitted infections, including chlamydia, gonorrhea, genital warts, genital herpes, syphilis and HIV (cause AIDS - acquired immunodeficiency syndrome )
Uterus: A female pelvic organ organ that holds and nourishes the fetus during pregnancy.

login = 35b88e093bb25be636f2ba74a83bf87c.

. Dịch vụ: Thiết kế website, quảng cáo google, đăng ký website bộ công thương uy tín

Related news

  • What are progestin-only birth control pills? As a contraceptive pill that only has progestin. It is often referred to as a "mini-pill". Normally, there are two types of female hormonal contraceptives: estrogen and progestin (progestin is a synthetic form of progesterone). Because this mini-pill ...
  • What is an intrauterine device? An intrauterine device (IUD), a small, T-shaped device, is attached to the end of the device with a string (this cord will be pulled out of the cervix so that it can be checked periodically. Are you still in the right place?). The intrauterine device is inserted into ...
  • What is family planning using natural methods? Natural family planning is a method of determining when you can have sex without becoming pregnant. During the menstrual cycle, there will be some changes in a woman's body. By observing these changes, it is possible to know when to have sex and when ...
  • What is contraception? Contraception is the prevention of pregnancy, also known as controlled birth. Most of us know about methods like birth control pills and condoms. However, there are several other options. When thinking about using birth control, talk to your doctor. The choice of ...
  • What is a barrier method of contraception? The barrier method of contraception acts as a barrier to prevent a man's sperm from meeting a woman's egg. Some barrier methods of contraception also protect the body from sexually transmitted diseases (STIs). Several barrier methods of contraception, such ...
  • What is Depo-provera? Depo-provera (medroxyprogesterone acetate) is an injectable contraceptive, with each dose effective for preventing pregnancy within 3 months. Depo-provera is a synthetic drug similar to progesterone, a normal hormone produced by the ovaries during each menstrual cycle. How ...
  • What is a combined hormonal method of contraception? Birth control pills, birth control patches, and vaginal rings are combined hormonal methods of contraception. The composition consists of two hormones: estrogen and progestin. How does combined hormonal contraception work? The combined hormonal ...
  • What is emergency contraception? Emergency contraception (also known as postpartum contraception) is the use of several methods to prevent unintended pregnancy after unprotected sex or insufficient protection. This is not a method of abortion, so it is not effective if you are pregnant. What forms ...
  • What is hormonal contraception? Besides the method of taking birth control pills and using intrauterine devices containing hormones, there are a number of other methods of contraception: implants, injections, rings and patches. How does hormonal contraception work? Hormonal contraceptives work by ...
  • What are the considerations when choosing contraception? To choose an appropriate contraceptive, consider the following: Contraceptive effect like? Easy to use? Is a doctor's prescription required? Ability to prevent sexually transmitted diseases? The pathology is acquired? Is gynecological ...